June 1862

The Confederacy was still reeling from recent defeats, but the Federal momentum was beginning to slow. Henry W. Halleck was using extreme caution in the West, and George B. McClellan was stalling in the East. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s recent Confederate victories in the Shenandoah Valley helped brighten southern spirits, and the deadly struggle for the Confederate capital had begun.

The Battle of Seven Pines: Day Two

1 Jun – Fighting resumed at Seven Pines and Fair Oaks, after the Federals had spent the night bringing up reinforcements and strengthening defenses.

Federals Pursue “Stonewall” Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley

2 Jun – The Federal pursuit of Major General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s Valley army continued, with the Confederates narrowly escaping two Federal armies converging on them from opposite directions.

From David Weisiger, 12th Virginia

2 Jun – Letter from Colonel Daniel Weisiger, 12th Virginia Volunteer Infantry, to his wife after the Battle of Seven Pines.

The Fall of Fort Pillow

5 Jun – Confederates abandoned an important garrison on the Mississippi River, opening a path for Federal naval forces to move downstream and threaten Memphis, Tennessee.

The Fall of Memphis

6 Jun – After capturing Fort Pillow, the Federal Western Flotilla immediately targeted Memphis, the Confederacy’s fifth largest city, further down the Mississippi River.

The Mumford Hanging

7 Jun – Major General Benjamin F. Butler, commanding Federal occupation forces in New Orleans, used dubious legal proceedings to make an example of a citizen for dishonoring the U.S. flag.

“Stonewall” Jackson Turns the Tables

7 Jun – Major General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s Confederate army continued moving south up the Shenandoah Valley and prepared to face two Federal forces approaching from both the east and west.

The Battle of Cross Keys

8 Jun – In Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, a portion of Major General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s Confederate army met a Federal advance from the northwest while Jackson faced a separate Federal threat from the northeast.

The Battle of Port Republic

9 Jun – Major General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson capped off his remarkable Shenandoah Valley campaign with another victory over the Federals sent to destroy him.

The Peninsula and the Shenandoah Valley

10 Jun – As Major General George B. McClellan’s Federal Army of the Potomac remained relatively idle on the Virginia Peninsula, Confederate General Robert E. Lee sent reinforcements to Major General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley.

Federal Armies Separate in the West

11 Jun – Washington officials informed Major General Henry W. Halleck that President Abraham Lincoln was “greatly delighted” with Halleck’s division of his “Grand Army,” as well as his plan to capture Chattanooga.

Stuart’s Ride Around McClellan

13 Jun – Confederate Brigadier General J.E.B. “Jeb” Stuart made a name for himself by conducting a daring reconnaissance mission all the way around Major General George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac.

“Stonewall” Jackson Looks to Move North

14 Jun – Major General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson proclaimed a day of thanksgiving for his army and sent a message to General Robert E. Lee requesting more men so he could invade the North.

Federals Threaten Charleston

15 Jun – Federal Brigadier General Henry W. Benham planned to attack Confederate positions on James Island, south of Charleston Harbor.

The Battle of Secessionville

16 Jun – Federal forces under Brigadier General Henry W. Benham attacked strong Confederate defenses near the town of Secessionville on James Island, just south of Charleston, South Carolina.

Bragg Replaces Beauregard

17 Jun – General P.G.T. Beauregard left his Confederate Army of Mississippi due to illness, causing controversy over whether he had gone absent without leave.

Running the Vicksburg Batteries

18 Jun – Flag Officer David G. Farragut began assembling a Federal naval squadron to run past Vicksburg, one of the last major Confederate strongholds on the Mississippi River.

Slavery Abolished in the Territories

19 Jun – The Republican Party upheld a campaign pledge to stop the expansion of slavery by banning the institution in U.S. territories.

“Stonewall” Jackson Moves East

20 Jun – Major General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s Confederates headed east to reinforce General Robert E. Lee on the Peninsula, while Federals in the Shenandoah Valley still did not know where Jackson was.

Bragg Takes Command in Mississippi

23 Jun – General Braxton Bragg announced that he would lead his new army from Tupelo, Mississippi, into eastern Tennessee to join forces with Major General Edmund Kirby Smith’s Confederates defending Chattanooga.

Battle Looms on the Peninsula

24 Jun – General Robert E. Lee issued written orders for his new Confederate Army of Northern Virginia to launch an attack on Major General George B. McClellan’s right flank on June 26.

The Seven Days Battles: Oak Grove

25 Jun – Major General George B. McClellan’s Federal Army of the Potomac tried inching closer to Richmond as Confederate General Robert E. Lee planned to drive the Federals off the Virginia Peninsula.

The Seven Days Battles: Beaver Dam Creek

26 Jun – General Robert E. Lee launched his planned assault on the Federal Army of the Potomac to drive the Federals off the Virginia Peninsula and away from Richmond.

The Army of Virginia

26 Jun – President Abraham Lincoln created a new army intended to do what Major General George B. McClellan could not–destroy the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and capture Richmond.

The Seven Days Battles: Gaines’s Mill

27 Jun – The third in a series of battles on the Virginia Peninsula occurred at Gaines’s Mill.

The Seven Days Battles: McClellan’s Withdrawal

28 Jun – The struggle on the Virginia Peninsula continued with sporadic fighting, as Major General George B. McClellan continued withdrawing his Federal Army of the Potomac toward the James River.

The Seven Days Battles: Savage’s Station

29 Jun – General Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia attacked the Federal Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula once more, targeting the rear guard as Major General George B. McClellan continued withdrawing.

The Seven Days Battles: Glendale

30 Jun – General Robert E. Lee made another attempt to destroy the Federal Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula, this time attacking at Glendale, Frayser’s Farm, and White Oak Swamp.

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Last Updated: 7/1/2017

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