The Fall of Selma

April 2, 1865 – The important manufacturing city of Selma, Alabama fell to Federal forces.

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest | Image Credit: Flickr.com

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest | Image Credit: Flickr.com

Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest made many attempts to block Brigadier General James H. Wilson’s Federal advance in northern Alabama. However, Forrest finally withdrew and concentrated his forces at Selma on the 1st.[1]

Wilson’s 12,000 Federal cavalrymen converged on Selma and forced the outnumbered Confederates to evacuate. Forrest and Lieutenant General Richard Taylor, the Confederate department commander, barely escaped capture as the Federals captured the town on April 2.[2]

Selma’s capture came with 2,700 prisoners, 40 cannons, and vast amounts of supplies. This deprived the Confederacy of yet another vital industrial center.[3]

The Federals soon continued on to Montgomery as Forrest, who had once been considered nearly invincible, had few resources to stop them. Wilson’s Federals captured Montgomery, the state capital and first capital of the Confederacy, on April 12.[4]

—–

[1] Korn, Jerry, Pursuit to Appomattox: The Last Battles (Alexandria, VA: Time-Life Books, 1983), p. 160; Long, E.B. with Long, Barbara, The Civil War Day by Day (New York: Da Capo Press, Inc., 1971), p. 661-63

[2] Korn, Pursuit to Appomattox: The Last Battles, p. 160; Long with Long, The Civil War Day by Day, p. 663-64

[3] Long with Long, The Civil War Day by Day, p. 663-64

[4] Foote, Shelby, The Civil War: A Narrative: Volume 3: Red River to Appomattox (Vintage Civil War Library, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Kindle Edition, 2011-01-26), Kindle Locations 20343-20353; Long with Long, The Civil War Day by Day, p. 663-64, 673-75

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2 thoughts on “The Fall of Selma

  1. […] H. Wilson’s Federal cavalry captured Selma, Alabama. Also in Alabama, Federal forces began laying siege to Fort Blakely in their attempt to capture […]

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  2. […] H. Wilson’s Federal cavalry captured Selma, Alabama. Also in Alabama, Federal forces began laying siege to Fort Blakely in their attempt to capture […]

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